'Desiring Machines' - new exhibition by Server Demirtas

Kinetica Artist Member Server Demirtas presents an exclusive and unique collection of five of his mechanical sculptures at a new exhibition ‘Desiring Machines’ at The M.A.D.Gallery in Geneva.

A master of creativity and construction, Turkish artist Server Demirtaş brings life to his artistic machines with intricate engineering. Desiring Machines intrigue with smooth, human-like movements that maintain stark contrast to the robotic appearance of each creation.

Desiring-Machines offers a refreshing perspective on kinetic sculpture with a visual experience blending art and engineering. Each Machine performs a unique and choreographed series of movements and gestures mimicking life and exploring the human condition. Over approximately 80 seconds, the animated visual spectacle captivates audiences and imparts a unique meaning for each observer.

Each kinetic sculpture is crafted entirely by hand from start to finish. The process begins with drawings and plans for the mechanical solutions that power the innovative mechanical art pieces. Demirtaş does not use the assistance of an engineer or software developer. “The most difficult part of the process is to design and produce the structure and mechanism to render the movements as I dream them,” Demirtaş points out.

At the heart of each mechanical sculpture is a set of Plexiglas wheels or cogs connected via cables and wires to execute the synchronized movements. The Plexiglas wheels are individually shaped to generate the specific movements of the different body parts creating the kinetic fluidity of the sculpture. Each sculpture is unique, requiring two to six months to design and construct the mechanics that create the mesmerising characteristics of the compilations.

The sculptures are created using mainly stainless steel, polyester, silicon, and Delrin, a synthetic polymer typically used in high-performance precision parts for its strength and low friction.

While movement and mechanics play an essential role in Demirtaş’s art, his sculptures are not about mechanics or intricacies of production; they are about the relationship between man and machines, exploring concepts of motion, perpetuity and inertia.

Share